June 2007 LSAT, Game 3, #12

Onward through Game Three of the June 2007 LSAT. Here's our setup for this Game. Question #12 says "Which one of the following CANNOT be true about Freedom's schedule of voyages?" So the question is telling us that the four incorrect answers could be true. The single, correct answer must be false.

There's really no way to predict this one in advance, because I haven't been given any new information to work with. Instead, I'm just going to tackle the answer choices and see which one seems like it would be a problem.  

A) T in week 6... Wait, what? The second rule says "T will be the destination in week 7," right? And the last rule says "no destination will be scheduled for consecutive weeks," right? Well if those two things are true, then... how can T be the destination in week 6? Uhhhhhhh, well, it can't. I didn't think this question would be this easy, but I'm 99.99% sure this will be our answer.

B) M in week 5... I see no reason why this would be a problem. In reality, I wouldn't even test this since I am so certain that A won't work. But for teaching purposes, what if we started with this?

M G  J  __  M  __  T

Boy, it sure seems like that would work. I wouldn't test this any further.

C) J in week 6... I see no reason why this wouldn't work. As a matter of fact, I already penciled out the beginning of this scenario in the setup. I'm not going to bother testing this.

D) J in week 3... Again, I see no reason why this wouldn't work. Just like C, I already penciled out the beginning of this scenario in the setup. No need to test.

E) G in week 3... I didn't anticipate this in my setup, since I was really focusing on J there. But G doesn't cause problems--remember that G is a necessary precedent for J, but that doesn't mean G can't also go in other spots. I wouldn't actually test this, but for teaching purposes, what if we started with this?

__  __  G  __  G  J  T

I don't see any problem with that. Since A slapped me in the face with its obvious impossibility, and B-E all look possible, I'm very comfortable here. Our answer is A.

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