LSAT

How to withdraw from the June LSAT

Are you registered for the June LSAT, but aren't able to take the test? Make sure you officially withdraw so the test will be removed from your file and prevent an absentee notation. The deadline is 11:59 pm Eastern Time on Monday, June 5. Here's what you need to do.

Log into your LSAC.org account, proceed to the LSAT Status page, and find the option to withdraw your registration. At this time, the only option is withdrawing online; no phone calls, mail or faxes. In addition, refunds are not available at this point, nor can you transfer your registration to another LSAT test date.

If you withdraw by the June 5 deadline, the test does not count as one of your three LSAT attempts. However if you cancel your score, it does count. If there are only a few days to go, and you're nowhere near your target score, it's time to withdraw. Don't waste an attempt when you're not ready.

Visit the LSAC website for more information on withdrawing from the June LSAT.

Want a list of FREE (and very cheap) resources to help you study for the LSAT? Sign up here and I'll send them right to you!

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June LSAT Registration Deadlines

clockIf you're planning to take the June 6 LSAT, make sure you register before it's too late!

The online, by mail, or by telephone deadline to register is Wednesday, April 20 (receipt deadline). The late registration deadline is Wednesday, April 27 (receipt deadline). The online receipt deadline is 11:59 pm Eastern Time (ET).

Don’t wait until the last minute to sign up! But if you do register on the deadline day, make sure you do so during the Law School Admission Council’s (LSAC) business hours.

Visit the LSAC website for more information or to register.

Want a list of FREE (and very cheap) resources to help you study for the LSAT? Sign up here and I'll send them right to you!

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Yelp Review of the Week: Whether You're Undecided or Ready for Law School, Give This Class a Try

happy-face-1191165Here’s what Jae from Millbare, CA had to say after he took my LSAT prep class.

I took the Fox LSAT class for a month and improved my score dramatically from the low 160's to 167-172 range. Nathan does an excellent job at teaching you the shortcuts that you need to know to be successful at the test, especially with the logic games section. His go-to strategy with the grouping games is especially good and makes those games a cake-walk. He also goes through tough Logical reasoning questions, showing you which operative words to look out for and why one answer choice is better than the other. If you find yourself getting questions wrong on practice tests and you have no idea why, this class will help you.

Another huge benefit for joining class is that you get his Fox LSAT Logical Reasoning Encyclopedia for free. It is a behemoth of a book with hundreds of logical reasoning questions with an entertaining and thorough explanation provided for every question and their answer choices. This helped me a lot, as I often found myself asking why a certain choice was incorrect when I was self-studying for the test. It will definitely help you sharpen your critical eye, so that you can find the correct answer choices faster and easier.

Finally, Nathan is a pretty awesome dude who is always willing to help outside of class time in case you have questions about the LSATs, law school, or careers in law. He is brutally honest however, and will not shy away from disillusioning you on the merits of going to law school. He keeps it real, and you should really listen to all that he has to say before fully committing. Law school debt is no joke and there may be no going back once you're in. Still, whether you are undecided or all-in on this law school thing like me, then you should definitely give this class a shot. You won't regret it.

Thanks for the nice words, Jae! You can read the review and other recommendations on Yelp.

Learn more about how my LSAT classes can help you conquer the LSAT.

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Yelp Review of the Week: The LSAT May Seem Boring, But Nathan Makes Studying Fun

shadow-1-1193727Here’s what Carlos from Los Angeles, CA had to say after he took my LSAT prep class. I was in Nathan's LSAT class and benefited greatly from it.

The material on the LSAT is boring as hell and Nathan does a great job of making the class fun with his humor. Nathan is constantly arguing with the speaker and using profanity (which is hilarious, btw) to keep the class alive. Actually, I think he's just being himself which makes the otherwise dry material very entertaining. Nathan scored a 179 on the LSAT so it seems he can do most of these in his sleep if he wanted to.

In addition to covering the LSAT section he does a 30 minute Q&A before every class (5:30-6pm) where you can ask him anything related to law school. He is always honest about the pros and cons of pursuing a legal career which I appreciated. He also did a great job of bringing in guest speakers to answer questions you may have.

Nathan is always available to his students. You can always email him and he'll get back to you. If you have a question about applying, want to send him your personal statement or got stuck on a question he's your man. I admire how available he makes himself. You can tell he wants to help people succeed on the LSAT and get into the best possible law school they can.

One thing I particularly appreciated is he allowed me to pay on a payment plan. This helped ease some of the financial burden of a $500 a month class. His prices are very reasonable and worth every cent but his flexibility was very much appreciated.

Nathan also offered proctored tests on the weekends so you get to mimic test conditions. I found those valuable.

Unless you're an outstanding test taker my advice would be to take the class for 1-2 months. At that point you start to see the patterns in some of the logic games and get a feel for how to set them up and you may be able to recognize certain types of questions throughout the test.

I 100% unequivocally recommend Fox LSAT. I researched a couple of places before choosing Nathan's class and preferred to support a local business and I can guarantee Nathan is funnier and more effective than any of the big test prep services out there.

Thanks Fox LSAT!

Thanks for the nice words, Carlos! You can read the review and other recommendations on Yelp.

Learn more about how my LSAT classes can help you conquer the LSAT.

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Logical Reasoning Questions Answered: What are Mistaken Reversals and Mistaken Negations?

what-s-that-1527433Lucy K. reached out to me with some questions about Logical Reasoning and asking for resources on mistaken reversals and mistaken negations. Here's what I told her about these terms and whether they're important when studying for the LSAT. Lucy K.: I'm working on a review of conditional reasoning right now. Do you have any resources on mistaken reversals? And also mistaken negations? I just worked through the LRB chapters on Weaken and Must Be True questions. The Weaken practice problem set went better than the Must Be True problem set, but I want to review them both. Right now I've been noticing that Weaken questions, compare/contrast dialogue between two speakers, // reasoning, principle, sufficient assumption, and flaw questions are LRs I've tended to get wrong.

I've noticed that I tend to get weirded out by long arguments, arguments with lots of formal logic, and some of the science/nature arguments (I always think I don't know what this jargon-word means, or I'm not an architect, biologist, anthropologist, et cetera, what if I'm missing something about a scientific process, or I think it would be great to diagram this LR question as I see the logic words, but I'm really scared that I'd diagram it wrong and/or am debating which abbreviations to use). I would like to practice these more.

Nathan: Oh dear. "Mistaken reversals"... "mistaken negations"... they're one and the same. I'm sorry you even have those two terms in your head, because you really don't need them. This is just something that LSAT dorks say when they want to impress someone. Logically, it's the exact same flaw. All you really need is the big picture. One example should suffice.

Premise: If you're eaten by a shark, then you're dead.

Mistaken reversal: Everyone who's dead was eaten by a shark. This is stupid because there are a lot of other ways to die. Like maybe a flock of rabid turkeys pecks you to death. Or whatever. Point is, it's obviously stupid. And believe it or not, this simple, obvious flaw is the LSAT's favorite thing to test. It's on every single LSAT.

Mistaken negation: If you're not eaten by a shark, then you're not dead. See, that's a slightly different statement but it's logically identical and it's stupid for the exact same reason. What about the rabid turkeys? What about all the other ways to die? This, again, is the LSAT's most common flaw.

Formally, the two flaws are contrapositives of one another. I suppose there is a technical difference in the form of the flaw, but it's simply not important enough of a distinction for you to bother knowing two different names for them. The terms "mistaken reversal" and "mistaken negation" have never appeared on the LSAT. Only in LSAT books. But not in my LSAT books, because I don't want you to waste your time on irrelevant technicalities.Generally, I am not in love with Powerscore's Logical Reasoning Bible for exactly this reason. It focuses on too many trees, so unsuspecting readers often miss the forest. It's not technically wrong (at least not often) but it's far too technical. Students come away thinking that the LSAT is harder than it really is.

Learn more about my LSAT prep class and how they can help you conquer the LSAT.

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Check Out Fox LSAT on the LSATisfy Blog

studying-2-1475294Have you ever wondered if private tutoring can help you with the LSAT? Samantha is a former Peace Corps worker who is now one of my LSAT students. She wrote about her experience working with me for individual tutoring on her blog, LSATisfy. Here are a few things she said: This afternoon I met with Nathan Fox for private tutoring in San Francisco. I had been a bit nervous, after all, I'm a fan and have listened to all of the Thinking LSAT podcasts. But he was incredibly friendly and casual, and it was the first time in the last 3 months of LSAT-studying-to-the-max, that I had fun with it.

Of course he didn't give me a magic button that I press and BOOM! 180! Which is of course what every person studying for the LSAT would love to have, but he definitely called me out on some of my big flaws that I know I'm guilty of (reading too quickly without enough attention to detail), he simplified a lot of the test for me. Didn't focus so much on strategies but took it back to being more natural, evaluating the arguments with attitude. Goodness knows I have no problem doing that in daily life.

More than anything I feel like I have a game plan, I have a better idea of what productive studying looks like, doing 35 minute timed sections, and not getting burned out. One thing that I really appreciated that he said was it is important not only to practice the logic but to also practice the attitude, so to study when I'm relaxed and want to do it, and not to make it a chore.

Thanks for the nice words, Samantha!

Read the rest of Samantha's post on her LSATisfy blog.

Learn more about my private tutoring options (Skype or in-person in San Francisco and Los Angeles), and how it can help you conquer the LSAT!

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Thou Shalt Pay Attention to the Type of LSAT Question

question-mark-1238622No matter what type of question you're looking at on the LSAT Logical Reasoning section, it's critical that you argue with what you're reading. But that's only half the battle. Once you've argued with the speaker, and made sure you've comprehended what they're saying, it's critical to figure out what kind of question you're dealing with. There's no point in looking at the answers until you know what you're looking for. This Commandment applies to all sections, but particularly to the Logical Reasoning. I'm shocked when a student says, "I didn't pick A because it seemed too strongly worded," on a Sufficient Assumption question. Sufficient Assumption questions love strongly stated answers! Stop being so formulaic, forget everything you learned from whatever gimmicky LSAT book you read before this, and pay attention to what the question is asking. You are smart enough to figure this out. Read every word on the page, figure out what they are asking, and answer the question. If you're not open to the possibility that you're smart enough to do this, then you really shouldn't even attempt it. I believe in you.

Here are examples of what various "question stem" wordings sound like for any given type of question.

FLAW:

-- Which one of the following most accurately describes a way in which the reasoning above is questionable? -- The reasoning in the argument is flawed because the argument -- Which one of the following most accurately describes a flaw in the reasoning above?

WEAKEN:

-- Which of the following, if shown to be a realistic possibility, would undermine the argument? -- Which one of the following, as potential challenges, most seriously calls into question evidence offered in support of the conclusion above? -- Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the support for the arguments conclusion?

STRENGTHEN:

-- Each of the following supports the arguments reasoning EXCEPT: -- Which of the following, if assumed, most helps to justify the reasoning above? -- Which one of the following, if true, most strengthens the columnist’s reasoning?

SUFFICIENT ASSUMPTION:

-- Which one of the following, if assumed, would allow the conclusion above to be properly drawn? -- The conclusion drawn follows logically from the premises if which of the following is assumed? -- The conclusion is properly inferred if which one of the following is assumed?

NECESSARY ASSUMPTION:

-- Which one of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends? -- The argument makes which one of the following assumptions -- Which one of the following is an assumption required by the argument?

MUST BE TRUE:

-- Which one of the following must be true if the statements above are correct? -- The above statements, if true, most strongly support which one of the following? -- Which of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?

MAIN CONCLUSION:

-- Which one of the following most accurately expresses the arguments conclusion? -- Of the following, which one most accurately expresses the conclusion drawn above?

AGREE/DISAGREE:

-- “Robert” and “Sarah” have committed to disagreeing on which of the following? -- “Beth’s” and “Carmen’s” statements provide the most support for the claim that they would disagree about whether -- The dialogue most strongly supports the claim that “Chris” and “Joe” disagree about which one of the following?

EXPLANATION:

-- Which one of the following, if true, contributes most to an explanation of the puzzling situation described above? -- Which of the following, if true, most helps to resolve the apparent discrepancy above? -- Which one of the following, if true, contributes to a resolution of the apparent paradox?

IDENTIFYING A GUIDING PRINCIPLE:

-- Which one of the following principles best justifies the above actions? -- Which one of the following principles is best illustrated by the information above? -- The reasoning above conforms most closely to which one of the following propositions?

APPLYING A PRINCIPLE GIVEN:

-- Which one of the following would be a proper application of the principle stated above? -- Of the following, which one conforms most closely to the principle illustrated by the situation described above? -- Which one of the following best illustrates the proposition above?

COMPLETE THE ARGUMENT:

-- Which one of the following most logically completes the argument? -- The conclusion of the argument above is most strongly supported if which one of the following completes the argument? -- Which one of the following most reasonable completes the argument?

STRATEGY OF ARGUMENTATION:

-- Which one of the following most accurately describes the method of reasoning used in the argument? -- “Which of the following most accurately describes the role played in the Philosopher’s argument by the claim that “…” -- The editorial undermines the conclusion of the causal argument by

MATCHING PATTERN:

-- Which one of the following arguments is most similar to the reasoning in the argument above? -- The reasoning in the argument above is most paralleled by the argument that there is -- In which one of the following is the pattern of reasoning most similar to that in the Doctor’s argument?

MATCHING FLAW:

-- Which one of the following arguments exhibits flawed reasoning most similar to that exhibited by the argument above? -- Which one of the following exhibits both of the logical flaws exhibited in the arguments above? -- The flawed pattern of reasoning in which of the following most closely resembles the flawed pattern of reasoning in the actor’s argument?

This post is excerpted from "Introducing the LSAT” (available on Amazon). Please drop me a line in the comments, or at nathan@foxlsat.com.

Learn more about my LSAT prep class and how they can help you conquer the LSAT.

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December LSAT Registration Deadlines

untitled-1398764-mDon’t miss the deadline to register for the December LSAT The deadline to register online, by mail, or by telephone is Friday, October 23 (receipt deadline). The late registration deadline is Tuesday, November 3 (receipt deadline). The online receipt deadline is 11:59 pm Eastern Time (ET).

Don’t wait until the last minute to sign up! But if you do register on the deadline day, make sure you do so during the Law School Admission Council’s (LSAC) business hours.

Visit the LSAC website for more information or to register.

Need help preparing for the December LSAT? Read why Fox LSAT stands out and how it will help you conquer the LSAT.

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June-July 2015 LSAT Class Results

Here are the results from my four-week class that wrapped up earlier this month, with 19 students submitting results for both test #1 and test #3. 

Test #1 Class Averages: June 30, 2015 (December 2012 official LSAT) Logic Games: 10.5 correct Logical Reasoning: 26.5 correct Reading Comprehension: 14.3 correct Total Raw Score: 51.3 correct Scaled LSAT Score: 146.5 Scaled LSAT Range: 132-163

Just 19 days later, the class had their final diagnostic:

Test #3 Class Averages: July 19, 2015 (December 2014 official LSAT) Logic Games: 13.6 correct (+3.1) Logical Reasoning: 32.7 correct (+6.2) Reading Comprehension: 16.4 correct (+2.1) Total Raw Score: 62.7 correct (+11.4) Scaled LSAT Score: 153.6 (+7.1) Scaled LSAT Range: 141-163

In 19 days, I'm ecstatic about this result. Seven LSAT points is an incredible improvement in less than three weeks, and it's even more impressive when you look at the percentiles. The class average moved from the 33d percentile into the 60th; that's the difference between not getting in and getting big bucks in scholarships. I couldn't be happier.

I'm particularly proud of the following students:

Biggest Improvement, Scaled LSAT Score: Chelsey, from 134 to 155 (+21)

Biggest Improvement, Logic Games: Joey, from 4 correct to 13 correct(+9)

Biggest Improvement, Logical Reasoning: Chelsey and Ricky, from 18 and 9 correct, respectively, to 34 and 25 correct, respectively (+16)

Biggest Improvement, Reading Comprehension: Chelsey, from 6 correct to 17 correct (+11)

I love what I do, and I'm super-grateful for all my students. Through hard work and a lot of good questions, they make my job easy.

October LSAT Registration Deadlines

time-1196952If you're planning to take the October LSAT, make sure you register before it's too late!

The deadline to register online, by mail, or by telephone is Friday, August 28 (receipt deadline). The late registration deadline is Wednesday, September 9 (receipt deadline). The online receipt deadline is 11:59 pm Eastern Time (ET).

Don’t wait until the last minute to sign up! But if you do register on the deadline day, make sure you do so during the Law School Admission Council’s (LSAC) business hours.

Visit the LSAC website for more information or to register.

Need help preparing for the October LSAT? Read why Fox LSAT stands out and how it will help you conquer the LSAT.

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Bright Sunshine and Migraines ... Should I Cancel My LSAT Score?

stop-2-1197500-mAnother painful LSAT test-day story from a test-taker asking if she should cancel her LSAT score. I don't think this student should cancel her score. Explanation follows the letter.

Hi Nathan,

I am still trying to figure out how the June LSAT went... It started out well but after the 15 minute break the sunshine got really intense and the asshole proctors wouldn't close the shades. I've had 3 Lasik surgeries in the past 5 years and all the surgeries have made my eyes hypersensitive to sunlight. To make a long story short, My eyes started to go black and I started to get a migraine. 

So that was shitty but the worst part was definitely the logic games! I am not a logic game master by any means, but I ALWAYS kill the first 2 logic games and get through the first few questions in the third game. I have no idea what happened on the October 2012 test, but the first game was a bitch. I don't know if it was my eyes being fucked up or if I was just having a mental breakdown but I was blank. I was forced to be the idiot that skips the first game! The second game was fine and I feel okay about the third. After the 5 minute warning I went back to the first game and tried to make some educated guesses but God only knows how that went. 

I feel like I should cancel this score. I fucked up on sections that I usually feel great about. I don't want to risk having a super shitty score on my record. I've found that most law schools will take your higher school and ask for an addendum explaining the situation but USF Law is one of the very few schools that still average the scores. 

Ahhh I don't know what to do!!

Well, that sucks. No doubt. The migraine couldn't have helped anything, and stumbling on the games is also a point in favor of canceling... this student seems to KNOW, for sure, that she could have done better on the games. I'd be willing to be that her December score will be higher.

Still, I don't think she should cancel! Here's an in-depth post I wrote on the topic, explaining why my answer is almost always "don't cancel."

The student is specifically worried about USF law here... USF law, apparently, claims to average a candidate's LSAT scores when evaluating their applications. I am speculating here, and I could be entirely wrong, but I don't believe them.

Why don't I believe schools that claim to average their scores? Because it would be stupid for them to average. Here's my logic:

FACT: Students pay a lot of attention to the US News rankings. Far more attention than they should.

FACT: Schools want to move up in the rankings, because it means they will get more and better applicants.

CONCLUSION: Because students pay attention to the rankings, schools have no choice but to pay attention to the rankings as well.

FACT: US News uses LSAT scores as one component of their rankings... they ask schools to submit the highest LSAT score for each member of their incoming class.

CONCLUSION: A school that chooses students based on average LSAT scores, rather than highest LSAT scores, is making itself look bad on the US News Rankings.

Example:

Student A gets 150, 150, and 165 on three attempts at the LSAT. Average score, 155. Highest score, 165.

Student B gets 160 on a single attempt at the LSAT. Average score, 160. Highest score, 160.

Schools that only consider highest scores when evaluating applications will clearly prefer student A. Schools that consider average scores when evaluating applications will clearly prefer student B. So schools that consider highest scores will admit Student A, and get to report a 165 for that student to US News. Meanwhile, schools that considers average scores when evaluating applications admit Student B, and have to report a 160 for that student to US News.

Now if you were an admissions officer, with your career on the line each time the US News law school rankings were posted, which method would you choose?

If I wanted to keep my job, I would do what most schools are doing these days and use the high score. Anecdotally, from my experience and the experience of other LSAT teachers, it looks like this is what almost all schools are actually doing in practice, no matter what they say.

By the way, if a school asked for an addendum "explaining" a lower score from this student, what should she say? The truth, obviously. "I had a migraine headache, and did the best I could." The only way a school could possibly react to that would be to ignore the lower score. They'd be idiots not to.

Leave a comment if you agree, disagree, or otherwise. And thanks for the questions!

-----

UPDATE:  My buddy Larkin Robson, who teaches LSAT in NYC, mostly agrees but adds this:

Harvard, Yale, and Stanford each either averages or takes multiple scores into account.  I also think that if someone 100% knows they bombed, there is no reason not to cancel.  I mean if you don't answer two whole games and you're shooting for a 170+ type of bomb where its effectively impossible to get the score you are aiming for.   

Thanks Larkin. There are two great points here. 1) The schools at the very top of the rankings don't have to play the US News rankings game, or at least they don't have to play the game slavishly. These schools may discriminate against a candidate with a lower previous LSAT score, but only because they have an almost infinite field of candidates to choose from. But this only applies to the top handful of schools.  2) Yes, if you are thinking about Harvard, Yale, and Stanford, and are shooting for a 170+, and you know, based on your Logic Games performance, that you couldn't have scored 170+, then maybe a cancel makes sense. But this only applies if you're looking at Harvard, Yale, and Stanford, and I do think there are still downsides to canceling, as laid out in my original post.

Learn more about my LSAT prep class and how they can help you conquer the LSAT.

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May-June 2015 LSAT Class Results

Here are the results from my four-week class that wrapped up earlier this month, with 14 students submitting results for both test #1 and test #3. 

Test #1 Class Averages: May 12, 2015 (October 2012 official LSAT) Logic Games: 13.8 correct Logical Reasoning: 32.8 correct Reading Comprehension: 17.1 correct Total Raw Score: 63.7 correct Scaled LSAT Score: 153.8 Scaled LSAT Range: 139-169

Just 18 days later, the class had their final diagnostic:

Test #3 Class Averages: May 30, 2015 (September 2014 official LSAT) Logic Games: 14.6 correct (+0.8) Logical Reasoning: 36.0 correct (+3.2) Reading Comprehension: 17.2 correct (+0.1) Total Raw Score: 67.8 correct (+4.1) Scaled LSAT Score: 156.5 (+2.7) Scaled LSAT Range: 149-174

In 18 days, I'm very happy with this result. Nearly three LSAT points is a lot in less than three weeks, and it's even more impressive when you look at the percentiles. Conservatively, the class average moved from the 60th percentile into the 70th; that's the difference between getting in and getting big bucks in scholarships.

I'm particularly proud of the following students:

Biggest Improvement, Scaled LSAT Score: Farrah, from 139 to 152 (+13)

Biggest Improvement, Logic Games: Linette, from 5 correct to 10 correct(+5)

Biggest Improvement, Logical Reasoning: Farrah, from 18 correct to 37 correct (+19)

Biggest Improvement, Reading Comprehension: Marissa, from 15 correct to 20 correct (+5)

I love what I do, and I'm super-grateful for all my students. Through hard work and a lot of good questions, they make my job easy.

April-May 2015 LSAT Class Results

Here are the results from my four-week class that just wrapped up, with 20 students submitting results for both test #1 and test #3. 

Test #1 Class Averages: April 7, 2015 (June 2012 official LSAT) Logic Games: 11.4 correct Logical Reasoning: 30.8 correct Reading Comprehension: 15.8 correct Total Raw Score: 58.0 correct Scaled LSAT Score: 151.3 Scaled LSAT Range: 129-172

Just 25 days later, the class had their final diagnostic:

Test #3 Class Averages: May 2, 2015 (June 2014 official LSAT) Logic Games: 14.3 correct (+2.9) Logical Reasoning: 31.7 correct (+0.9) Reading Comprehension: 16.3 correct (+0.5) Total Raw Score: 62.3 correct (+4.3) Scaled LSAT Score: 154.2 (+2.9) Scaled LSAT Range: 132-172

This group improved a bit less than many groups do, and I'm not sure why. I'm happy with the logic games improvement, but the verbal improvement fell a little flat. Oh well, the class did improve by three points per person in just over three weeks, so I'm not terribly disappointed.

I'm particularly proud of the following students:

Biggest Improvement, Scaled LSAT Score: Kelsey and Andy, from 146 to 158 and 143 to 155, respectively (+12)

Biggest Improvement, Logic Games: Andy, from 4 to 14 correct (+10)

Biggest Improvement, Logical Reasoning: Kelsey, from 25 correct to 39 correct (+14)

Biggest Improvement, Reading Comprehension: Andrea, from 10 correct to 16 correct (+6)

I love what I do, and I'm super-grateful for all my students. Through hard work and a lot of good questions, they make my job easy.

March-April 2015 LSAT Class Results

Here are the results from my four-week class that wrapped up earlier this month, with 18 students submitting results for both test #1 and test #3. 

Test #1 Class Averages: March 10, 2015 (December 2012 official LSAT) Logic Games: 13.2 correct Logical Reasoning: 29.5 correct Reading Comprehension: 14.5 correct Total Raw Score: 57.2 correct Scaled LSAT Score: 150.0 Scaled LSAT Range: 138-167

Just 18 days later, the class had their final diagnostic:

Test #3 Class Averages: April 2, 2015 (December 2014 official LSAT) Logic Games: 13.6 correct (+0.4) Logical Reasoning: 33.4 correct (+3.9) Reading Comprehension: 17.2 correct (+2.7) Total Raw Score: 64.2 correct (+7.0) Scaled LSAT Score: 154.6 (+4.6) Scaled LSAT Range: 139-170

In 18 days, I'm very happy with this result. Four and a half points on the LSAT is a lot in less than three weeks, and it's even more impressive when you look at the percentiles. Conservatively, the class average moved from the 44th percentile into the 60th; that's the difference between not getting in and probably getting some scholarship money at many schools. I'd be happy with these results if every class performed like this. (But in practice, many classes do even better.)

I'm particularly proud of the following students:

Biggest Improvement, Scaled LSAT Score: Matt, from 141 to 152 (+11)

Biggest Improvement, Logic Games: Jess and Srikanth, from 12 and 9 correct to 17 and 14 correct, respectively (+5)

Biggest Improvement, Logical Reasoning: Roger, from 25 correct to 33 correct (+8)

Biggest Improvement, Reading Comprehension: Alissa, from 10 correct to 18 correct (+8)

I love what I do, and I'm super-grateful for all my students. Through hard work and a lot of good questions, they make my job easy.

Yelp Review of the Week: This Student Scored in the 90th LSAT Percentile

1372708393ljdhsHere’s what Matthew F. from San Rafael, CA had to say after taking my LSAT prep course.

I found Fox LSAT on Yelp and enrolled in eight weeks of classes before the December LSAT. I have to say that Nathan Fox is as good at it gets and I could not have imagined a better LSAT teacher. Nathan  owns his company and the treatment that you get his unrivaled by any of his competitors. I improved 16 points on my LSAT and ended up scoring in the 90th percentile.

The classes with Nathan are two days a week for four hours. Although that is a long time, Nathan made it seem as quick as possible. He is a funny no bullshit kind of guy who believes that the only way to improve your LSAT score is to practice the test. The homework consisted of doing about two tests every week and going over them in class.

Nathan makes everything super clear and is always willing to answer questions. He gives out his cell phone number and emails you back promptly and will answer inquires about any aspect of the law school process. Nathan has helped me out with my personal statement and and figure out where I have applied to school. When I hear back, I will definitely want his input about deciding where I should go. If you are interested in LSAT help, look no further. Nathan Fox is the best in the business.

Thanks for the nice words, Matthew! You can read his review and other recommendations on Yelp.

Learn more about my LSAT prep class and how they can help you conquer the LSAT.

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Yelp Review of the Week: This Student Went from a LSAT Score of 140 to 160+

paradise-1406450-mHere’s what Jackie H. from Los Angeles, CA had to say after taking my LSAT prep course. I decided to take an LSAT course from Nathan way in advance (5 to 6 months) of my actual exam. The first practice exam I took, I scored in the upper 140s (pretty depressing). Now, I'm scoring in the upper 160s. After months and months of digesting/practicing the various techniques Nathan taught me, things are starting to click and figuring out the right answers are becoming intuitive.  

The great thing about Nathan is that he makes the LSAT seem really approachable and thoroughly beatable, which is essential since your view of the exam can hugely determine your final score. I think one of the reasons for my 20 point jump is because I literally see the LSAT as one big game/puzzle I can eventually win w/patience and a lot of practice (kind of like the stupid games I play on my phone for hours). Now, I just look at the questions and scoff at them. I mean, really, can't the testmakers come up w/more creative, difficult questions to throw at me?

Thanks, Nathan!

Thanks for the nice words, Jackie! You can read her review and other recommendations on Yelp.

Learn more about my LSAT prep class and how they can help you conquer the LSAT.

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January-February 2015 LSAT Class Results

Here are the results from my class that wrapped up tonight, with 21 students submitting results for both test #1 and test #3. 

Test #1 Class Averages: January 13, 2015 (October 2011 official LSAT) Logic Games: 10.2 correct Logical Reasoning: 28.1 correct Reading Comprehension: 15.0 correct Total Raw Score: 53.3 correct Scaled LSAT Score: 147.8 Scaled LSAT Range: 132-166

Just 18 days later, the class had their final diagnostic:

Test #3 Class Averages: January 31, 2015 (October 2013 official LSAT) Logic Games: 13.1 correct (+2.9) Logical Reasoning: 31.2 correct (+3.1) Reading Comprehension: 16.1 correct (+1.1) Total Raw Score: 60.4 correct (+7.1) Scaled LSAT Score: 152.4 (+4.6) Scaled LSAT Range: 141-165

In 18 days, I'm very happy with this result. Four and a half points on the LSAT is a lot in less than three weeks, and it's even more impressive when you look at the percentiles. Conservatively, the class average moved from the 37th percentile into the 52nd; that's the difference between not getting in and probably getting some scholarship money at some schools. I'd be happy with these results if every class performed like this. (But in practice, many classes do even better.)

I'm particularly proud of the following students:

Biggest Improvement, Scaled LSAT Score: Juliana, from 153 to 164 (+11)

Biggest Improvement, Logic Games: Jaime, from 9 correct to 21 correct (+11)

Biggest Improvement, Logical Reasoning: Carson, from 18 correct to 31 correct (+13)

Biggest Improvement, Reading Comprehension: Jessica, from 12 correct to 20 correct (+8)

I love what I do, and I'm super-grateful for all my students. Through hard work and a lot of good questions, they make my job easy.

Yelp Review of the Week: A Fantastic Approach to the LSAT and Law School

wooden-pencils-and-pencil-sharper-1228821-mHere’s what a student from San Francisco, CA had to say after working with me to prepare for the LSAT. Nathan Fox is a brilliant LSAT teacher! I would give him more than five stars if Yelp allowed it. Nathan's explanations of the Logic Games and Logical Reasoning are illuminating, concise and clear. His conceptual quizzes are challenging and summarize the concepts that one needs to understand prior to taking the LSAT. He is available to help via email, phone and after class. He even offers to look at personal statements and guide students through the application process.

In addition to working my butt off, I attended every single one of his classes and completed every homework assignment. I improved more than 20 points.

Take Nathan's class, work hard, and you will do well on the LSAT.

Thanks for the nice words! You can read his review and other recommendations on Yelp.

Learn more about my online LSAT prep classes and how they can help you conquer the LSAT.

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February LSAT Registration Deadlines

untitled-1398764-mWith the busyness of the holidays just ahead, don’t miss the deadline to register for the February LSAT.

The deadline to register online, by mail, or by telephone is Wednesday, January 7 (receipt deadline). The late registration deadline is Friday, January 16 (receipt deadline). The online receipt deadline is 11:59 pm Eastern Time (ET).

Don’t wait until the last minute to sign up! But if you do register on the deadline day, make sure you do so during the Law School Admission Council’s (LSAC) business hours.

Visit the LSAC website for more information or to register.

Need help preparing for the February LSAT? Read why Fox LSAT stands out and how it will help you conquer the LSAT.

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November-December 2014 LSAT Class Results

Here are the results from my class that wrapped up last week, with 22 students submitting results for both test #1 and test #3. 

Test #1 Class Averages: November 4, 2014 (June 2011 official LSAT) Logic Games: 13.2 correct Logical Reasoning: 30.7 correct Reading Comprehension: 14.7 correct Total Raw Score: 58.6 correct Scaled LSAT Score: 150.2 Scaled LSAT Range: 130-170

Just 18 days later, the class had their final diagnostic:

Test #3 Class Averages: November 22, 2014 (June 2013 official LSAT) Logic Games: 14.9 correct (+1.7) Logical Reasoning: 34.5 correct (+3.9) Reading Comprehension: 17.4 correct (+2.7) Total Raw Score: 66.8 correct (+10.3) Scaled LSAT Score: 156.0 (+5.8) Scaled LSAT Range: 140-172

I'm very happy with this result. Six LSAT points in three weeks is great, and it's even more impressive when you look at the percentiles. On average, the class moved past 22 percent of all test-takers. That's the difference between not getting in and getting a full ride. Students should fight for every point they can get on the LSAT.

I'm particularly proud of the following students:

Biggest Improvement, Scaled LSAT Score: Sara, from 134 to 149 (+15)

Biggest Improvement, Logic Games: Sara, from 6 correct to 13 correct (+7)

Biggest Improvement, Logical Reasoning: Fiona, from 20 correct to 35 correct (+15)

Biggest Improvement, Reading Comprehension: Herschel and Dario, from 9 and 8 correct to 17 and 16 correct, respectively (+8)

It's been a great year at Fox LSAT. Thanks to all of my students, for making my job so easy. It rarely feels like work.