books

The Fox LSAT Logic Games Playbook is Here!

I'm excited to announce that my latest book in my LSAT book series, The Fox LSAT Logic Games Playbook, is now available to purchase! The LSAT's logic games are easier than you think, and this book is designed to prove it. I regularly see the biggest improvement from his students on this section, and in my down-to-earth, irreverent style, I'll show you how to see through the BS and start learning how to crush the logic games.

The formula is simple: First, you'll attempt a game on your own. Then, I'll will walk you step-by-step through a full solution to every question, showing you how you can be 100 percent certain of each answer. You'll also have opportunities to practice each game again on your own, and through repetition, you'll start spotting the recurring patterns. I'll demonstrate the best ways to prioritize your time on the logic games so you can focus your energy on the truly challenging questions. No nonsense. No made-up trademarked buzzwords. No confusing jargon. And best of all, no pulled punches. So grab a pencil and crack this book. Let's get it on.

The Fox LSAT Logic Games Playbook is available on Amazon.com. I'd love to hear what you think!

Want a list of FREE (and very cheap) resources to help you study for the LSAT? Sign up here and I'll send them right to you!

What This Capitol Hill Staffer Had to Say About Fox LSAT Books

us-capitol-building-4-431645-mI recently received an email from a Capitol Hill staffer who read my the Fox LSAT books while preparing for the LSAT. Here's what she had to say. Writing "fan mail" for an LSAT book is hands down one of the more weird things I've ever done. But after literally laughing out loud in the middle of a coffee shop while reading one of your explanations, I decided I had to send you a note.

I'm a Capitol Hill staffer and I'm currently taking Ben Olson's class to prep for the February LSAT (or maybe the June one ... Depends on how many happy hours I'm willing to trade for time with your book this month!).

Once I take the test (and hopefully crush it!), I'll write this book the awesome Amazon review it deserves. And maybe I'll take you up on the offer to try talking people out of law school! In the mean time, I just wanted to say a quick thank you -- this book is really great.

---

Learn more about how my LSAT test prep books and can help you conquer the LSAT.

Image credit: bshafer via freeimages

Yelp Review of the Week: Fox LSAT Books and Online Classes

gavel-952313-mHere's what Meghan M. from Syracuse, New York had to say about my books, the online course, and working with me. I had a really wonderful experience working with Nathan. I emailed Nathan to ask some questions before signing up for the course and within 20 minutes I received a phone call from him! I was able to speak honestly and openly with him and he was incredibly informative. That night I signed up for his online LSAT review course.

From the start of my work in the review book and watching the lessons posted to his site, I emailed Nathan with questions in which he provided feedback almost instantaneously. He provided positive reinforcement and recommended specific tactics/approaches on completing the next practice exam. 

If you are looking for a LSAT review course that is not a waste of time and money, sign up for Nathan's course!

Thanks a lot, Nathan!

Thanks, Meghan, for your nice words! You can read Meghan's review and other recommendations on Yelp.

Learn more about my online classes and how they can help you conquer the LSAT.

Image credit: creationc via freeimages

Q and A: Strategizing for the LSAT

studying-ahead-642559-mI often receive questions from readers who are using the Fox LSAT test prep books to study for the LSAT. Here's some advice I recently gave a student planning to take the test this year. Question: I'm four tests in and tend to start strong. But by the third and fourth section, my brain starts lapsing and my test becomes riddled with errors. Any advice on how to correct this? Also, being only four tests in and am averaging a score of 154, should I plan to take the September LSAT over the December test?

Answer: Don't underestimate the importance of adequate sleep, nutrition, exercise, and recreation. I'm sure you're working very hard (at not just the LSAT) and it can be easy to fall into a "brain lapse." I advise students to practice for the LSAT only when they're feeling their best. If you notice you're making a lot of silly errors, it's an indication that maybe you're running yourself ragged, and maybe you should put the LSAT book down for a bit. Maybe a walk or a nap would be a better decision in the long run.

Fatigue in the late sections can also arise from lack of mastery over the topics. If you've only done four practice tests, then you're barely in the beginning stages of an adequate LSAT preparation. After you've done 8, or 12, or 20 full practice tests, you'll be a lot better at them. When you're better at something, it's not nearly as tiring.

Taking the September test is a good goal to shoot for. Two tests per week over the next five weeks gets you to 14 full practice tests. For some students, that would be enough. You'll know whether you're ready or not based on the scores from those tests. If you push for September and aren't ready, you can always change to December. (This can get expensive in terms of LSAC fees, but it's such a high-stakes test that it's absolutely worth it.) If you are ready for September, then a good score would allow you to apply to schools earlier. But more importantly, taking the September LSAT allows you to take another shot in December if necessary. That's the best reason to take it in September.

Then again, if you're not ready, you're just not ready. If your practice scores aren't where you think they could be, then you absolutely have to postpone. Don't take the LSAT until you're ready. An LSAT of, say, 160 in September is nowhere NEAR as good as a 165 in December. Even a few LSAT points is worth holding out for.

Learn more about my LSAT test prep books and how they can help you conquer the LSAT.

Image credit: a_kartha via freeimages